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2013: Abraham Lincoln Birthplace

On our foray into Kentucky we saw a sign for the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace.  Since we had visited the Lincoln Presidential Museum and burial site a few months before I thought that it would be fun to stop and see where Abraham Lincoln was born.  Interestingly enough, the home had been long ago demolished, and in its place this large “temple” erected that had a replica log cabin built inside of it.  It was quite a grand structure considering that there was hardly anything inside of it.  There was a very interesting visitor’s center and gift shop that was on the grounds.  The top right hand picture is of the underground stream where the family got their water.

On the left hand page you will notice a white circle with a purple date stamp in it.  Almost every National Park site will have one of these stamps, and we usually collect them to put in the scrapbook because they highlight the location and the date that we were there.

On the right hand page I placed the two brochures that we picked up at the visitors center.  They are not affixed to the page, but rather held in place by the strip of cardboard that I placed down the center.  This cardboard is held in place by three brads.  I did this because the brochures were double sided and there was no good way to attach them to the page.  It is a little more difficult to get these ones off of the page to view as the reader would have to slide the whole page out of the plastic protector and then remove the brochures from the side.

2012: Abraham Lincoln Tomb

2012: Abraham Lincoln Tomb

2012: Abraham Lincoln Tomb

After we visited the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library we decided to go to the Lincoln Tomb in Springfield, IL – it is just a few miles away from the Library.   Our exchange student, Jonathan, was amazed that we could go right inside the memorial building and see the tomb, as “ordinary people”.  I chose a blue background for this page to match the wonderful blue skies that we were having that day, and that showed up in the pictures on the left hand page.  I used my cricut machine to cut the wreaths on the page.

For the Abraham Lincoln Signature I actually downloaded a SVG file of his signature and then imported it into a program called Sure-Cuts-A-Lot and then used that program and my Cricut to cut it out.  Unfortunately you can no longer buy a version of Sure-Cuts-A-Lot that works with the Cricut machine, but it is available for many other die cutting machines.

ScrapBook Software - MyMemoriesSuite

2012: Thanksgiving and Abraham Lincoln Library

2012: Thanksgiving and Abraham Lincoln Library

2012: Thanksgiving and Abraham Lincoln Library

For Thanksgiving we went to visit my parents in Illinois and while we were there I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to take Jonathan to see the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum and Library.  Jonathan had also heard that one of his exchange student friends was staying in Springfield, Illinois, so we invited him to go to the museum with us.

This spread highlights these two events – our Thanksgiving meal together and our time at the museum.  Unfortunately I didn’t think about taking too many pictures at Thanksgiving Dinner, but I wanted Jonathan to remember this American Tradition in the Scrapbook.  I also didn’t get too many pictures at the museum because we were not allowed to take them in the exhibits.  you will notice though that we were fortunate enough to be there when the Lincoln family was present and we got a great picture with them.

On the left hand page I used a pair of sharp pointed scissors to carefully cut the hinge and place it over the photograph to give the page a 3D effect.  I used my Cricut machine to cut the two parts of the Turkey and then used a black marker to highlight the edge of the Turkey so that it would stand out on the page.    I also used my Cricut to cut out the letters for the Title on this page.

2012: Abraham Lincoln Library Closeup

2012: Abraham Lincoln Library Closeup

On the right hand page I do something that I don’t usually do – I put all of the postcards on the page on top of each other.  I don’t usually like to use postcards, because I prefer my own pictures, but since we were not allowed to take any in the museum, I used the post cards.  I also did not want to take a full page up with postcards.  I used my Crop-A-Dile Big Bite Punch  to punch a hole through all the postcards and the background paper and then used a brad to hold them in place.  I used a second larger brad at the bottom to hold them together.  I put this all together after the plastic protector sheet was in place – so that they pictures can be viewed by the reader.

Shutterfly Photo Books

Washington DC 2012: Petersen House – where Lincoln died

Washington DC 2012: House where Lincoln died

Washington DC 2012: House where Lincoln died

After our visit to the White House we walked the route the Lincoln took on his Journey to the Ford Theater, where he was assassinated.  We arrived much earlier than anticipated and realized that we would have opportunity to visit the Petersen House and Museum, where Lincoln died.  The line stretched down the road, but it was worth the wait.  While we had not originally planned on visiting this site, I do recommend it as a “must do” on a vacation/tour to Washington DC.

I overlaid the background paper with cutoffs of Lincolns speeches and writings from the earlier National Archives page.  On the left hand side is a photgraph of the historical marker and a postcard of the building.  My pictures of the building included the line of people, so using the postcard provided a clearer and unobstructed view.  You will also noticed the National Park Service passport card stamp as well.

The right hand side has three pictures that I took inside of the room where President Lincoln died.  From the pictures you can see how I choose my background papers.  I used the checkerboard from the bedspread to inspire the background paper, and the stripes in the wall paper are duplicated with the strips of paper and ribbon that I attached the the background paper.

Washington DC Tours

Washington DC 2012: China Town

Washington DC 2012: China Town

Washington DC 2012: China Town

Washington DC Tours
This page celebrates our last stop on the tour, and is quite an eclectic page.  There are times when theme for several items does just not make sense and this is the case for this page.

After the tour was over our guide asked us what our plans for supper were and we mentioned that we wanted to go to China Town and asked what restaurant he would suggest.  Wonderfully he offered to walk with us to his favorite place which he did.  On the way he showed us some historical markers of interest which I have showcased on the left hand page – the site of the first Telegraph Office in the United States, and the Surratt Boarding House, which is where some conspirators plotted the abduction in Abraham Lincoln.  The ornamental design in the background I cut with my Cricut machine using the “Ornamental Iron 2” cartridge.

The right hand page includes the menu from the Chinatown Express, where we ate, and some pictures from the front of the store.  You will notice that I put two pictures together  to be able to show all that was occurring.  Because the window was small I could get the whole scene in one shot.  I often will do something like this to create a panoramic effect, and I think that it looks cool.  You will also see that I included all of our fortunes from our Fortune cookies 🙂

If you look closely you will notice that I have a small black cutout of an umbrella – which doesn’t make much sense to this page.  It represents a family joke of something that happened that is a family secret and somewhat funny to us now.  🙂  Don’t be afraid to put things like this in your memory pages as they will invoke smiles from those who know the inside story.

Washington DC 2012: Lincoln Memorial

Washington DC 2012: Lincoln Memorial

Washington DC 2012: Lincoln Memorial

Washington DC Tours
The next stop on our tour was the Lincoln Memorial.  Again, this was another site where we were thankful to have a tour guide.  He explained the history of the building, explained the statue, and showed us some mistakes in the building, which I found very interesting.

On this page I used several pictures of the same item (the statue) and then placed them on the page in order so that you get a sense of movement around the statue on the page.  The left bottom picture on the right hand page is a little hard to read in this photograph, but it is a picture of the marker where Martin Luther King, Jr gave the “I have a Dream” speech.

You will also notice that I included a patch from the location, as well as another stamp from the collection.  I also did not corner cut any of the photos as I wanted the stark bleak lines to mimic the architecture of the Memorial.

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